Blog Archives

Rhinos, their impacts on savannah and the ghosts of ancient poos

Photos of mutilated rhino corpses have become all too familiar to conservationists lately. Sadly Rhino horn has been making a comeback on the east-Asian black market, mainly fuelled by the myth that it is effective at curing various minor ailments, such as hangovers and fevers, as well as major diseases such as cancer.

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Missing the thylacine

Two thylacines in Washington D.C. National Zoo / Credit Smithsonian Institution 1904

Two thylacines in Washington D.C. National Zoo / Credit Smithsonian Institution 1904

I was just reminded by a recent paper of a video clip from Hobart Zoo of a thylacine, sometimes called a Tasmanian tiger or Tasmanian wolf. I have always found it very moving. It’s believed to show the last of the species – it’s not actually known if it was male or female, but the nickname Benjamin seems to have stuck. I find myself wishing that I could see one, study one, that it was still here. Read the rest of this entry